From this years Von Europe 2007 in Stockholm it’s clear that the operators existing Business Models are dying, but they won’t go with-out a fight I think. The operators are so inclined to keep their revenue streams by moving into services areas, and charging for content or services, that they are more looking to reserve parts of the Internet for their own services, and thus creating “pockets of Internet”.

Part of the problem is regulation (either too much, or inappropriate), where existing Telecom operators are using the regulations to enforce their existing models, and the regulations are keeping new players at an noncompetitive position. For example some countries has legal requirements for a regulated operator to terminate International call in the country of origin (mostly due to requirements for military agencies to monitor traffic).
Another thing is IMS, that is based on being non-open for third-party services, is deployed to allow operators to apply traditional Telco business models to new services carried over IP, and keep control of services, end-to-end. The operators will close of any of competition’s services, if a cable/broad-band operator offers a pay-ed for Video service, they will block Joost, if they offer or own a paid for dating Community, they might block-out match.com and so on, or why not steer their users to use their own Internet Search service (where they are generated ad-revenue) and block of Google.

Now you might think that, no one would be a customer of a Internet service that blocks of Google today, and they won’t be blocking Google, but they will be blocking any future Google’s, YouTube’s, MySpaces or other upcoming services just as the Mobile Operators has done.

IMS (IP Multimedia System), developed with-in 3GPP, is a service delivery platform supplied by companies such as Ericsson, Nokia etc (traditional Telco solution suppliers), to integrate Voice, Video between phones, mobiles and computers using IP. It has been created basically so that the operators can build n-Play services that they control and effectivly control which services you can use from your Internet connection, just as on your mobile, where an operator can close the built-in VoIP client of certain mobiles so that you can not use that over your WiFi connection at home or at a hotspot.

Some links:

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